There should be a mandatory  one hour delay before responding/sending to  e-mail or e-chat.  With out facial expression, body language, or voice inflection it is difficult to give full meaning to a printed message.  A postal letter requires some period of time for reflection on what is written or read.  I should have waited one hour before posting "A pox on you all.'

  • Comments (11)
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  • I have been following this site for over a year. I enjoy reading responses that apply to help us to become better practitioners. Should not the be the focus of this site?
  • Broken English

    All the nuance disappears. When talking to someone in a languge that's not easy for them, you discover that idioms and other forms of communication disappear. You need to be extremely direct and specific in order to make yourself understood.

    The thing is, just about everyone speaks some form of broken English. It's "broken" because it doesn't match our version. Their language and our language isn't the same one—the other person may think your English is broken too.

    Our ability to communicate with one another isn't nearly as sophisticated or error free as we think it is.

    You will be misunderstood. If it's critical that we understand you, say it more clearly. Say it twice. Better yet, act it out, live it, make it an action, not merely a concept. 

     so says Seth Godin

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


  • Maybe we are not rude.    Maybe we are not good at putting our thoughts into words.

  • Can you imagine how rude it would be if we didn't post under our own names! I am constantly amazed to read what people write - especially about political matters - under the guise of a pseudonym. Shameful.

    I remember recently when an anonymous poster wrote something rude about a local news anchorwoman, saying that she was fat and how dare she give recommendations about healthy living (if my memory serves me well.) It was said in such a hurtful way that some smart person figured out who had posted it and went to ask him why he had written it and in that manner.

    Wow, was he surprised!

  • Video with audio messages might be better than written posts.  Visual facial clues and  speech intonation  apparently are necessary for normal people to understand each other.  I wonder if this site has the capability for this.  If not some other site will.

  • Such great advice.  Language can be so easily misunderstood, whether in speaking or writing.  While it's tempting with a busy schedule to just type a quick response, it's better to wait until there's time to review what we're writing and be professional about it.  I have a habit of writing letters, posts, etc in a Word document so I can save it and edit it as needed.  Of course, there have been times when I wasn't able to make it through the editing process in a timely manner and ended up ditching the post.

     I agree that Present is a great forum.  I does take some bravery to stick ourselves out there and post our thoughts, but as others have pointed out, it allows us to grow, personally and professionally.  I know I've learned a lot reading the topics discussed here, and even more so when I actively engage in the dialog.  Thanks Alan and the Present team for providing this platform.

  • We owe a debt of gratitude for the tireless energy Dr. Sherman puts into this site as editor and for the role model that he is for us. 

    Okay so you mentioned about tireless energy. What about the energy coming from solar panels? Such energy might not be tireless because at night it rests but rest assured it probably will come up again the next day. 

    Dan

  • Quote:
    I think PRESENT eTalk, and any industry or professional blog, is a public conversation.  Our Mothers all taught us years ago when we were wee lads and lassies the meaning of civility and how you need to be more polite in public than you are with, say, your friends, family or even co-workers.  You need only to scan the numbers of views some of our conversations here get, to realize it's a public conversation. Parts of these conversations are being cited by other blogs, all of them are getting indexed by Google and other search engines.  I conceived of PRESENT Podiatry and PRESENT Diabetes, and now PRESENT Wounds, Ostomy and Contenence as online education communities - virtual conferences that are ongoing, that you can stop by on your time schedule, when it's best for you.  There is a real sense and value to your reputation in these communities.  Colleagues and others come to know you for everything you say.  I really think we should endeavor to keep it positive, and constructive, and colleagual and civil - like a conversation you'd want other people to overhear you having.  We're all here to improve ourselves professionally and improve the Podiatry profession while we're at it.  The ideas that shape a profession like podiatry and improve it, experience less friction now that we're all talking publicly online. 

    And there is nothing at all wrong with disagreeing with someone...as scientists, we should question everything, test every theory, and never stop turning back to reconsider the things we were so convinced of, when there is new data collected or observed.  Good discussions often benefit from a gadfly, a provocateur to stir the pot up.  There's nothing wrong with that.  But let's try to keep the spirit, the esprit de corps of eTalk civil, polite and most of all...collegial.

    Alan

    Huge Consensus Here!

    I think another thing that rises as important here on Present Podiatry is the fact that every member has the same vote and voice delivered as his/her opinion on any case, matter or subject. The masters and the practitioners and the students all type on a similar keyboard and each of us may be a master of one or more subjects and a student on another.

    There are those of us that monitor, those of us who post once in a while and those of us who post on a regular basis.  Each of us motivated by passion, opinion and hopefully evidence and civility.

    I have learned so much here on Present about posting on a blog, about podiatry, about politics and about life. No one can argue that there are many smart people here and that we share a common thread in Podiatry.

    We owe a debt of gratitude for the tireless energy Dr. Sherman puts into this site as editor and for the role model that he is for us.  When he posts (such as here), I read and absorb and then reflect on my viewpoint as compared to his with an open mind because I know that his intent is to educate, guide, entertain and keep the flow on Present Podiatry even keeled and productive. I know that he wants to see podiatry and all of us individually thrive.

    Dennis

     

  • Absolutely, Dwight. I think PRESENT eTalk, and any industry or professional blog, is a public conversation.  Our Mothers all taught us years ago when we were wee lads and lassies the meaning of civility and how you need to be more polite in public than you are with, say, your friends, family or even co-workers.  You need only to scan the numbers of views some of our conversations here get, to realize it's a public conversation. Parts of these conversations are being cited by other blogs, all of them are getting indexed by Google and other search engines.  I conceived of PRESENT Podiatry and PRESENT Diabetes, and now PRESENT Wounds, Ostomy and Contenence as online education communities - virtual conferences that are ongoing, that you can stop by on your time schedule, when it's best for you.  There is a real sense and value to your reputation in these communities.  Colleagues and others come to know you for everything you say.  I really think we should endeavor to keep it positive, and constructive, and colleagual and civil - like a conversation you'd want other people to overhear you having.  We're all here to improve ourselves professionally and improve the Podiatry profession while we're at it.  The ideas that shape a profession like podiatry and improve it, experience less friction now that we're all talking publicly online. 

    And there is nothing at all wrong with disagreeing with someone...as scientists, we should question everything, test every theory, and never stop turning back to reconsider the things we were so convinced of, when there is new data collected or observed.  Good discussions often benefit from a gadfly, a provocateur to stir the pot up.  There's nothing wrong with that.  But let's try to keep the spirit, the esprit de corps of eTalk civil, polite and most of all...collegial.

    Alan

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