Hello all, 

 

I have a question about the VA, maybe someone can confrim because I am too afraid to ask..

 

I have my DPM, and my liscence but no residency. I currently work at the non-private sector and am considering using one of the programs to get a BSN. 

 

However, I see jobs opening up for podiatry, and not all of them require a residency or board certification. I can use my related job history and time in grade, and I have a podiatrist who will allow me to do an unpaid preceptorship to get some much needed clinic time/experience.

 

I wont be able to do surgery, but am also working on a wound care cert. Really I would be happy working in the clinic.

 

I would love to work in the VA as a podiatrist. 

Is this feasible or no? Any pods in the system able to advise?

 

Would I love a residency? sure. But I have been unmatched, (2013) and instead of going that route..and with time out of school..and a family..and statistics for previous years very low in the match..I really didnt see any option other than to get a related job to provide for my family and pay down my debt. I figured I would use my degree somehow instead of sitting on my hands, getting despondent over my "fate."

But I do podiatry related work, and I miss it.

 

any suggestions or advice would be greatly appreciated.

 

Regards,

 

AS

 

 

 

 

 

  • Comments (9)
  • Quote:

    Quote:

    I have not read the bill.  But that is not how I understand it.  I think it changes the pay structure of DPMs in line with Dentists, MDs and DOs.  

    Again this is my opinion and in no way reflects any view of the administration of the VA or Federal government. I only bring it up as perspective for those reading this and being interested in applying to the VA for employment.  Hiring decisions are made locally, so different clinics may desire different criteria.  You should not read this and be discouraged from applying. you should however have contingency plans and expect the process to be competitive.

    Marc,

    I suspect Dave can fill in the details. I neither work for, nor have personal experience of the VA. I do know that one of my residency colleagues just left the VA, after one year out. I guess it's not for everyone and the experience may likley vary between locations.

    My understanding of the VA Equity Pay Bill is that it would move DPM's from the Associated Health category to the Medical Health or whatever it is called categary that MD/DO/DDS's are in. We would then be paid the same, based on the criteria used for them now.

    Board Certification is one factor that I know of. I'm sure there are others. DPM's in the VA run the range in terms of what is expected and what we do. Could a PA/RN cut toenails? Certainly, but that is such a small part of what we do.

    Number wise I am told the same as Dieter repeats but with a clarification: there are supposedly only 4 LOWER EXTREMITY orthopedic surgeons on the VA payroll. There are certainly many times that number doing hips, knees, arms, neck, etc.

    The number of DPM's in the VA is about 400. Doubling our salary still only represents what's been called a 'rounding error' in the overall budget.

    Dave Gottlieb, personal opinions only

  • Quote:

    I have not read the bill.  But that is not how I understand it.  I think it changes the pay structure of DPMs in line with Dentists, MDs and DOs.  

    Again this is my opinion and in no way reflects any view of the administration of the VA or Federal government. I only bring it up as perspective for those reading this and being interested in applying to the VA for employment.  Hiring decisions are made locally, so different clinics may desire different criteria.  You should not read this and be discouraged from applying. you should however have contingency plans and expect the process to be competitive.

    Marc,

    I suspect Dave can fill in the details. I neither work for, nor have personal experience of the VA. I do know that one of my residency colleagues just left the VA, after one year out. I guess it's not for everyone and the experience may likley vary between locations.

  • I have not read the bill.  But that is not how I understand it.  I think it changes the pay structure of DPMs in line with Dentists, MDs and DOs.  

    Again this is my opinion and in no way reflects any view of the administration of the VA or Federal government. I only bring it up as perspective for those reading this and being interested in applying to the VA for employment.  Hiring decisions are made locally, so different clinics may desire different criteria.  You should not read this and be discouraged from applying. you should however have contingency plans and expect the process to be competitive.

  • Quote:

    All the positions that I came across required both board certification and a few years private practice experience.  I suspect if the parity bill ever goes through, the VA will then hire more PAs than DPMs.  Right now there are 2 PA/NP podiatry jobs and no listings for podiatrists.  Might be happenstance, but they are looking to replace PCPs and Anesthesiologists with NPs and PAs so I would expect the same for podiatry.


    Marc,

    That's a dour prediction from an insider's perspective. The VA Bill is aimed to give the DPM pay-parity for surgical work that is undertaken. The statistic, I believe, is there are only 4 Orthopedic Surgeons in the VA service (assuming that is correct). The PA/NP cannot replace the surgical worker ... or can they?! 


  • Private practice is being squeezed. Is it easier for recent podiatric residency graduates to get VA jobs than board certified applicants? Is it easier for recent podiatric residency graduates to get jobs that are not affiliated with the VA than board certified applicants? There has been positive positings on how wonderful the job opportunities are for recent podiatry graduates. Are these same job opportunities available for board certified applicants?

  • All the positions that I came across required both board certification and a few years private practice experience.  I suspect if the parity bill ever goes through, the VA will then hire more PAs than DPMs.  Right now there are 2 PA/NP podiatry jobs and no listings for podiatrists.  Might be happenstance, but they are looking to replace PCPs and Anesthesiologists with NPs and PAs so I would expect the same for podiatry.

  • "With private practice being squeezed, There are generally a high number of board certified applicants even for non surgical positions."

     

    Private practice is being squeezed. Is it easier for recent podiatric residency graduates to get jobs than board certified applicants?

  • Dr Gotlieb has a vastly more well informed opinion than mine. His post is also more optimistic. But I do have a different perspective after being hired on to the VA a year ago. All the positions I looked into told me that a podiatry job position has to be applied for and funded before a position can be had. That position has to then be opened up for all eligible applicants to apply; Lastly it is not a written policy but all DPM hires will be board certified. With private practice being squeezed, There are generally a high number of board certified applicants even for non surgical positions.
    It absolutely does not hurt to try. But if you want a VA job you should expect a lengthy process. And,expect to relocate, frequently at your own expense. Check usajobs.gov and good luck.
    There may be exceptions where certain non surgical CBOC facilities may consider or prefer your credentials. I would definitely arrange a meeting with a chief pod and chief of surgery when you apply.
    I find the VA to be a greatful, rewarding and enjoyable environment. If you can get in, go for it.
    Opinion above is mine and does not represent the position of my employer.
  • Anne,

    You best bet is to meet with the Chief of Podiaty at the VA you would want to work at. Discuss your qualifications and, in particular, your desire to manage toenail issues. While many VA Medical Centers may have a hiring freeze they may be able to bring people aboard on a Fee-Basis or Contract Status basis. You won't be a VA employee but it gets you in the door and a paycheck.

    Another thing to keep in mind is that no two VA's are the same.

    Good luck and keep trying for that residency.

    H. David Gottlieb, DPM personal opinions only