Sometimes patients refuse to excise their warts and opt for chemical treatment. Dermoscopy can provide information about the halo surrounding blood vessels. I thought it would make sense that if the white halo present surrounding the hairpin shaped vessels in seborrheic keratosis, then a similar white color would be present in any halo surrounding the vessels in a wart. 

Now I am furthermore guessing that if a pinkish halo is present surrounding the blood vessels in a lesion resembling a seborrheic keratosis, such a pink halo might represent a possible malignant problem. Similarly if a wart like lesion has a pink like halo surrounding red dots there might be more than just a wart. Perhaps it would be best to send a dermatoscopic picture of the pink like halo with a biospy of the lesion to a dermatopathologist. 

  • Comments (3)
  • Dan,

    Please, these posts are written poorly, have no connecting language and appears to assume that everyone knows what you are talking about. Please pick one solitary issue and explain and teach while you ask questions.

  • This post has been changed on Nov 7 2016

    I believe this pinkish or reddened color could also be due to trauma. If one is faced with the possibility of trauma or malignancy, perhaps it is better to be cautious and to biopsy the area. It might be helpful if the following information is sent with the biopsy specimen to a dermatopathologist:

    1. any history of trauma to the lesion,

    2. any history of skin cancer,

    3. any family history of skin cancer

    4. a dermatocopic image of non contact polarized dermocopy and non polarized dermoscopy. The non polarized dermoscopy might show  a blue white veil, any milea cysts. The non contact polarized dermoscopy would best emphasize the vascular structures and the color of any surrounding halo as well as the shape and distribution of vascular structures. If the dermatopathologist is not familiar with dermoscopy perhaps the laboratory might have the availability of a consultant that is. 

     

     

  • Quote:

    Sometimes patients refuse to excise their warts and opt for chemical treatment. Dermoscopy can provide information about the halo surrounding blood vessels. I thought it would make sense that if the white halo present surrounding the hairpin shaped vessels in seborrheic keratosis, then similarly in a wart that same white color would be present in any halo surrounding vessels.  

    Now I am furthermore guessing that if a pinkish halo is present surrounding the blood vessels in what might be a seborrheic keratosis is a troublesome sign of a possible malignant problem, then it would be logical to assume anytime a pink like halo is present surrounding the dots in a suspected wart then carcinoma or melanoma should be suspected. This an additional reason to send such dermatoscopic images to dermatopathologists familiar with the color of halos surrounding vesn:

    Can't agree with this one, Dan

    Dennis